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American History (HIST 1307, HIST 1308)

Sponsoring U of M Academic Department: History

HIST 1307 - Authority and Rebellion: American History to 1865

Credits: Three University of Minnesota semester credits

U of M Requirements Met with this Course: Meets U of M liberal education requirement in the Historical Perspective Core

U of M Catalog Description: Conflict/change, from colonial era through Civil War. Colonization/resistance, slavery, nation-building, westward expansion, gender roles, religion, reform, race/ethnicity, immigration, industrialization, class relations. Students use primary sources, historical scholarship.

Additional Course Information: Issues, events, and ideas in the social, economic, political, and intellectual history of the United States, from the moment of earliest European contact through the Civil War and Reconstruction. Indigenous America before 1492, European conquest and colonization, revolution and nation-building, national expansion, political culture and reform movements, slavery, immigration, industrialization and labor, family and gender roles, religion and culture.

Student Qualification Requirements: Students enrolling in HIST 1307 must be juniors or seniors in high school (9th and 10th graders are not eligible) and in the top 30% of their class, or have instructor approval, to participate.


HIST 1308 - Global America: U.S. History Since 1865

Credits: Three University of Minnesota semester credits

U of M Requirements Met with this Course: Meets U of M liberal education requirement in the Historical Perspective Core

U of M Catalog Description: U.S. history since Civil War in global context. Emancipation. Forms of labor. Immigration. Citizenship. Changing conceptions of race/gender. Hot/cold wars. Reform/rights movements. Globalization. State power. Students use primary sources, historical scholarship.

Additional Course Information: Forces that shaped emergence of modern and global America from end of Civil War to present. Shaping of the modern industrial/post-industrial economy. Work and everyday life. Race relations and immigration. Popular culture. Politics and reform movements. Impact of war on American society. Role of the United States as a world power, before, during, and after Cold War.

Student Qualification Requirements: Students enrolling in HIST 1308 must be juniors or seniors in high school and in the top 30% of their class, or have instructor approval, to participate. Ninth and tenth grade students are not eligible to participate in this course.

Textbook:
Recommended: Out of Many: A History of the American People, Faragher, John Mack, et al. (Vol. 1 or 2 for the separate courses or combined edition if teaching both), 2006. Approximately $100 per volume on Amazon.com in 2012, or combined volume for approximately $140.

In addition to this text, teachers assign supplemental books, scholarly articles, and first-hand accounts (primary sources) which vary from instructor to instructor.

Faculty Coordinator:
Lisa Norling is an associate professor of American history at the University of Minnesota. She teaches a range of undergraduate and graduate courses in early American history and in her own area of research and publication: American and comparative women’s, gender, and family history. Phone: 612-624-4501, E-mail: norli001@umn.edu

Sample Syllabus for American History 1307
Sample Syllabus for American History 1308

 

Frequently Asked Questions

Are all of the readings specified or mandated by the University of Minnesota? If not, what are some of the choices?
The textbook is recommended: John Mack Faragher, et al, Out of Many: A History of the American People. The group of participating teachers has also reviewed and identified supplemental readings and resources (e.g. books and articles by historians, first-hand historical documents and imagery), from which individual instructors pick and choose for their own students, either by ordering copies of the books for their classrooms or by copying/scanning and distributing individual articles or other sources.

Do teachers have choice in assignments? Are there required assignments?
There are two “common assignments” for each course, which are 3-5 page essay papers. One common assignment is an historiographic essay in which students review and analyze differing historical interpretations of a given event, such as Bacon’s 1676 Rebellion (Hist 1307) or early 20th-century Progressive Reform (Hist 1308). The second common assignment is a documents analysis (Hist 1307) or an oral history (Hist 1308). Teachers are free to choose and design any other assignments for the course.

Who creates the exams?
Individual teachers prepare and administer their own tests.

Is there a training and mentoring system for new CIS History teachers?
There is not a formal mentoring system. However, teachers generally share materials and ideas in workshops and are encouraged to contact veterans for support and advice. New teachers also benefit from workshops that focus on course content and University processes, as well as an orientation to College in the Schools that will familiarize them with the support available through CIS and prepare them for administrative tasks such as registering students and posting grades.

High school class schedules vary; can a teacher in the block system teach history?
All courses offered through CIS have the same minimum number of contact hours as the on-campus sections. Teachers adapt the University schedule to fit the schedules at their high schools.

What happens at typical teacher workshops?
Typical activities at CIS workshops include meeting University faculty and hearing about their recent research in the discipline; reviewing and/or developing student assessment tools; sharing instructional materials; discussing particular content, pedagogy, or assessment of the University course; and receiving updates on CIS program policies and practices.

What happens at typical student field days?
Student field days provide an opportunity for CIS students to meet their peers from other high schools and experience how the introductory U.S. history survey courses are taught on the U of M Twin cities campus. In a large-group lecture, supplemental activity such as viewing a historical documentary and small-group discussion meetings, the students build upon and expand their learning on a selected historical topic (which changes from year to year), practice analytical and communication skills they have learned in class, and explore the Twin Cities campus. 


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