Jump to navigation. Jump to content. Jump to search.

 

Pre-Symposium Short Courses

Sunday, August 18, 2013

A.M. SHORT COURSES (8:00 a.m. – 12:00 noon)

Introduction to LID (ASCE Short Course)
Rainwater Harvesting for Stormwater Management Benefits (ASCE Short Course)

P.M. SHORT COURSES (1:00-5:00 p.m.)

Advances in Design and Monitoring to Improve Green Infrastructure Performance (ASCE Short Course)
Community Stormwater Response to a Changing Landscape and Climate: Identifying Barriers and Opportunities for Adaptation
Incorporating LID into Municipal Programs (ASCE Short Course)
Operation and Maintenance of LID Practices to Maintain Long Term Performance (ASCE Short Course)

FULL DAY SHORT COURSE

Using WinSLAMM™ (v10) to Predict Stormwater Pollution Loads and Evaluate LID Management Approaches - Overview


 

Introduction to Low Impact Development (ASCE Short Course)

Registration fee before July 25, 2013: $185
Registration fee after July 25, 2013: $225
8:00 a.m. – 12:00 noon

Presenters
Michael Clar, P.E., DWRE, CFM
Bruce T. Wulkan, Senior Policy Advisor, Puget Sound Partnership
Steve Trinkaus, PE, M.ASCE, Trinkaus Engineering

This short course will provide participants with a basic understanding of LID approaches and techniques and how these techniques help achieve stormwater management goals and protect water quality and stream health. The short course will cover impacts of land development on hydrology and water quality; LID objectives and principles; site design measures; and an overview of LID practices, including bioretention/rain gardens (and other landscape-based solutions), pervious paving, green roofs, rainwater harvesting, and more. The short course will also present examples of applications of LID in the U.S. and abroad and describe how LID is being integrated with stormwater management and permit compliance.

Rainwater Harvesting for Stormwater Management Benefits (ASCE Short Course)

Registration fee before July 25, 2013: $185
Registration fee after July 25, 2013: $225
8:00 a.m. – 12:00 noon

Presenters
Dwane Jones, North Carolina State University
Steve Burian, PhD., University of Utah
Kathy DeBusk, North Carolina State University

We recommend participants bring a laptop for the software demonstration and design example!

This short course will provide an overview of the key issues related to implementation of rainwater harvesting as part of a comprehensive stormwater management program. Topics will include the urban water cycle, design, management, maintenance, public education, and professional training needs.

Learning Objectives

  • Describe impacts of watershed-scale rainwater harvesting on the urban water budget
  • Apply design techniques and software to size rainwater harvesting cisterns
  • Conduct cost-benefit analysis to estimate project costs and payback period
  • Identify and recommend management, maintenance, and education requirements to support implementation of rainwater harvesting for stormwater management.

Advances in Design and Monitoring to Improve Green Infrastructure Performance (ASCE Short Course)

Registration fee before July 25, 2013: $185
Registration fee after July 25, 2013: $225
1:00-5:00 p.m.

Presenters
Scott Struck, Ph.D., Geosyntec Consultants
Ken MacKenzie, P.E., Urban Drainage and Flood Control District
Holly Piza, P.E., Urban Drainage and Flood Control District
Jane Clary, Wright Water Engineers, Inc.
Rob Roseen, Geosyntec Consultants
Marcus M. Quigley, PE, CPESC, Geosyntec Consultants

This short course will expose participants to new and innovative approaches and application of Green Infrastructure that have advanced the state of the practice. The presentations focus on design, monitoring, and evaluation of Green Infrastructure (GI) practices to determine ways to improve specific features and operation for more effective treatment of stormwater runoff. Participants will learn how they might use the International BMP database to inform selection of Green Infrastructure techniques based on detailed performance evaluation of monitored systems. The short course will also present research results that consider pollutant-specific engineered media applications, as well as provide more detail on adequate monitoring protocols to assess unit treatment process and system performance. In addition, this short course will illustrate the development of case study pilot projects designed specifically for BMP monitoring evaluation and testing. Participants will gain exposure to cutting-edge research focused on optimizing Green Infrastructure design and see a demonstration of real-time monitoring and management that enchances system performance.

Learning Objectives

  • Understand the principles and objectives behind GI as a stormwater and CSO management technique
  • Comprehend the importance of design; construction; and design and construction specifications, standards, and guidance for assuring performance
  • Interpret International BMP Database information to improve selection and anticipated performance of practices.
  • Recognize the value of monitoring with pilot projects and how monitoring informs design, construction, and long-term performance
  • Appreciate innovative designs and monitoring to improve GI performance.

Community Stormwater Response to a Changing Landscape and Climate: Identifying Barriers and Opportunities for Adaptation

Registration fee before July 25, 2013: $75
Registration fee after July 25, 2013: $115
1:00-5:00 p.m.

Presenters
Latham Stack, Managing Scientist, Syntectic International, LLC
Michael Simpson, Chair of Environmental Studies, Antioch University New England
James Gruber, Director of Sustainable Development and Climate Change, Antioch University New England
Trisha Moore, Post-Doctoral Research Associate, University of Minnesota Saint Anthony Falls Laboratory
Leslie Yetka, Education Manager, Minnehaha Creek Watershed District

Many regions of the country are experiencing more frequent and intense storms, and will continue to do so. The capacity of existing stormwater infrastructure may be inadequate resulting in more frequent flooding, increased property damage, public safety concerns, and impacts to the quality of downstream water bodies. Development and redevelopment can exacerbate the problem, but also provide an opportunity for communities to make sound planning decisions that reflect adaptation to our new environment.

Understanding tools and techniques that facilitate planning at a community level is the first step towards shaping a community’s response to a changing climate. This interactive workshop will provide practical information on how to:

  • Assess stormwater infrastructure vulnerability and required capacity under both existing and future precipitation conditions
  • Identify stormwater adaptation options and costs - including the role of Low Impact Development (LID) - to mitigate impacts from changing precipitation patterns
  • Manage uncertainty associated with modeling future conditions
  • Effectively communicate technical information to local stakeholders and decision-makers to promote stormwater adaptation planning.

Attendees will leave with an understanding of the need for action, the knowledge and resources required to act, and skills for empowering decision-makers in their community to respond to a changing climate.

Participants in this short course include those involved in stormwater management, community development and redevelopment, municipal operations, design professionals, developers, contractors, local policy makers, and others concerned about local stormwater adaptation planning.

Incorporating LID into Municipal Programs (ASCE Short Course)

Registration fee before July 25, 2013: $185
Registration fee after July 25, 2013: $225
1:00-5:00 p.m.

Presenters
Carol Hufnagel, P.E., Tetra Tech
Scott Struck,Ph.D., Geosyntec Consultants
Jim Theiler, City of Omaha, Nebraska
Shanti Colwell, Seattle Public Utilities
Dan Christian, P.E. Tetra Tech
Anne Thomas, P.E. Tetra Tech
Bob Spencer, Seattle Public Utilities

This short course will provide attendees with insight into key components of a green infrastructure program. The short course helps to describe and explore the key institutional framework elements with practical suggestions to make green infrastructure part of the everyday practice. Tools and techniques to address the naysayers, examples of developing municipal programs, maintenance responsibilities, and engaging internal and external stakeholders will all be covered in this short course.

Learning Objectives

  • Identify important elements that are characteristic of successful LID Programs
  • Recognize and appreciate real and perceived barriers to LID approaches and provide possible solutions to these barriers.
  • Discuss various types of incentives that can be useful in greater adoption of LID within a program
  • Describe some of the pros and cons of maintenance strategies to better understand the cost implications and requirements for long-term application of LID in a municipal program
  • Gain an appreciation for how education and outreach can improve a programmatic approach to LID projects.

Operation and Maintenance of LID Practices to Maintain Long Term Performance (ASCE Short Course)

Registration fee before July 25, 2013: $185
Registration fee after July 25, 2013: $225
1:00-5:00 p.m.

Presenters
Bill Hunt, Ph.D, P.E. North Carolina State University
Dr. Bill Lord, North Carolina State University
Dr. John Gulliver, Ph.D, P.E University of Minnesota
Dr. Andy Erickson, University of Minnesota
Dr. Pete Weiss, Ph.D, P.E Valparaiso University

Municipalities across the United States must manage stormwater runoff from roads, streets and parking lots. To manage stormwater, many low impact development and green infrastructure BMPs have been built. These devices include: wet retention ponds, bioretention areas, swales, stormwater wetlands, permeable pavement, rainwater harvesting systems, proprietary devices, and level spreaders. BMPs must have annual, and sometimes more frequent, inspection and maintenance to perform as intended. Maintenance includes hydrologic and water quality function, landscape functions, and consideration of impacts on human health and safety. Many communities across the US are now requiring annual inspection, and if called for, maintenance of BMPs. BMPs are not managed as standard landscape features, as they are water quality treatment devices, and specialized training is needed to perform inspection and maintenance activities. BMP Inspection and Maintenance also presents a business opportunity for inspection by licensed professionals such as engineers and landscape architects, and maintenance by landscape and other green industry professionals.

Learning Objectives

  • Understand stormwater, how it affects water quality, and regulations associated with it
  • Understand stormwater management devices used across the US and how they function
  • Understand inspection and maintenance requirements of each stormwater practice.
  • Appreciate research result demonstrating benefits of routine maintenance.

Using WinSLAMM™ (v10) to Predict Stormwater Pollution Loads and Evaluate LID Management Approaches - Overview

Registration fee before July 25, 2013: $195
Registration fee after July 25, 2013: $235
8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Presenters
James A. Bachhuber, AECOM
Roger Bannerman, United States Geologic Survey (USGS)
Caroline J. Burger, AECOM
Robert E. Pitt, Department of Civil, Construction, and Environmental Engineering, University of Alabama
John Voorhees, AECOM

This short course is a one-day version of the normal two-day training session conducted under the University of Wisconsin, Department of Engineering Professional Development.

WinSLAMM™ is a Windows-based, continuous simulation urban stormwater quality model that has been in use for over 30 years. The newest version 10 incorporates substantial improvements including a graphical interface and algorithms to better simulate infiltration and evapotranspiration - the processes behind many LID practices. The course will provide background information on the mechanics behind the model and an overview of its possible applications. Course participants will also learn how the tool utilizes local, long-term rainfall records, source area conditions, and other parameters to better represent stormwater runoff volume, quality, and stormwater control measure treatment performance. Finally, the workshop will provide an opportunity for participants to apply the model to example class problems representing stormwater control measure selection, design, and performance analyses. Participants will be provided a trial license of WinSLAMM™ before the class and should bring their own laptops with the software pre-loaded.

Learning Objectives

  • Understand the theory and approach of the model’s simulation of rainfall / runoff; pollution load generation, and multiple treatment processes.
  • Understand the input data requirements for WinSLAMM™
  • Learn how to use the model to represent urban land use conditions
  • Learn how to setup the model to represent various stormwater management measures – both traditional and LID
  • Learn the multiple levels of model output and how the output can be viewed and analyzed.
  • Understand the strengths and limitations of the model.